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Valtteri Bottas wins F1’s season-opening Austrian Grand Prix

Valtteri Bottas won a chaotic season-opening Austrian Grand Prix on Sunday while Formula One champion Lewis Hamilton finished fourth after getting a late time penalty.

The race was interrupted three times by a safety car and nine of 20 drivers abandoned, including both Red Bulls of Max Verstappen and Alexander Albon — who tried to overtake Hamilton on the outside with 10 laps left, touched wheels and flew off track.

Bottas celebrates after winning the Austrian Grand Prix. (Mark Thompson/The Associated Press)

Hamilton was given a five-second time penalty for causing the collision, having earlier been hit with a three-place grid penalty after an incident in Saturday’s qualifying was reviewed by stewards.

Although Bottas started from pole position and Hamilton from fifth, it looked like a straight fight between the two Mercedes drivers as has been the case so often in recent years.

But late drama in Spielberg ensured otherwise and Hamilton’s time penalty meant Charles Leclerc took second place for Ferrari and Lando Norris sent McLaren’s garage into raptures — and threw all social distancing rules out of the window amid the euphoria — with third place.

It was the 20-year-old British driver’s first career podium and his superb final lap was the fastest of an exciting opening race. Norris became the youngest British driver to secure a podium finish and the third youngest ever in Formula One.

Drivers all wear ‘End Racism’ T-shirts, 6 don’t kneel

Formula One drivers all wore a black T-shirt with “End Racism” written on it before the start of the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix on Sunday, but six of the 20 drivers did not take the knee.

Kimi Raikkonen, Max Verstappen, Charles Leclerc, Daniil Kvyat, Antonio Giovinazzi and Carlos Sainz Jr. were those who did not.

World champion Lewis Hamilton, the only black driver in F1, wore a T-shirt with Black Lives Matter on the front and End Racism on the back.

Hamilton, who knelt alongside Sebastian Vettel, at one point bowed his head pensively while Kvyat pointed to the anti-racism message on his T-shirt.

Hamilton has spoken widely about racism in recent weeks following the death in Minneapolis of George Floyd — a handcuffed and unarmed Black man — after a police officer pressed his knee on Floyd’s neck for nearly eight minutes in May. Hamilton attended a Black Lives Matter march in London and is setting up a commission to increase diversity in motorsport.

Soccer players on fields in England and Germany have taken the knee together simultaneously before games in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, and F1 drivers discussed what they should do during a drivers’ briefing on Friday evening.

Leclerc, Verstappen explain choice

Leclerc and Verstappen wrote on Twitter before the race why they chose not to kneel.

“I believe that what matters are facts and behaviours in our daily life rather than formal gestures that could be seen as controversial in some countries,” Leclerc said. “I will not take the knee but this does not mean at all that I am less committed than others in the fight against racism.”

Verstappen explained his choice.

“I am very committed to equality and the fight against racism. But I believe everyone has the right to express themselves at a time and in a way that suits them,” the Dutch driver said. “I will not take the knee today but respect and support the personal choices every driver makes.”

Hamilton called out other F1 teams on Thursday for not doing enough to combat racism, and said the sport still needs to push for more diversity. Mercedes is competing in an all-black car instead of the usual silver, while Hamilton and Bottas have “End Racism” written on the car’s halo.

Hamilton praised some drivers for speaking out against racism, but he still feels others need to do more and he raised that in their briefing.

“Silence is generally complicit. There still is some silence in some cases,” he said on Saturday. “There are people who still don’t fully understand exactly what is happening and what (is) the reason for these protests.”

Motorsport’s governing body FIA is donating one million euros ($1.12 million) to improve diversity in motorsport.

“Financing internships and apprenticeships for under-represented groups to ensure that they can fulfil their potential and have access to promising careers,” the FIA said on Sunday.

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